Which Tissue Provides Mechanical Strength To Plant?

  1. Collenchyma tissue is made up of elongated living cells that have irregular main thick walls.
  2. These cells also have hemicellulose, cellulose, and pectic components in their composition.
  3. Petioles, leaf veins, and stems of young plants all benefit from its support, structure, and mechanical strength, as well as its flexibility.

This makes it possible for the plant parts to bend easily without breaking.

Which of the following tissue provide mechanical strength to plants?

Plants get their mechanical strength from the tissue known as collenchyma. A plant or a developing organ inside a plant is said to have mechanical tissue if the tissue in question gives support and mechanical strength to the plant or organ. Collenchyma, which is alive, and sclerenchyma, which is dead, are the two types of ground tissue that provide a plant its greatest mechanical strength.

What provides mechanical rigidity to the plant cell walls?

Sclerenchyma, which is found in the cell walls, gives the plant its mechanical stiffness. When present, the xylary fibers and the conducting sclerenchyma, both of which are considered to be tracheary features, also contribute to the mechanical stiffness of the organ.

Which part of the plant provides a hydrophobic surface for water transport?

The water-conducting xylem cells have an interior surface that is hydrophobic, which not only helps with water transport but also contributes to the mechanical strength of the plant. In addition, the weight of the water that is being moved upward in the plant is supported by the xylem cells, as is the weight of the plant itself. Therefore, the response that is right is ‘Xylem.’

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What is the role of xylary fibres in mechanical rigidity?

  1. When present, the xylary fibers and the conducting sclerenchyma, both of which are considered to be tracheary features, also contribute to the mechanical stiffness of the organ.
  2. Sclerenchyma, xylem, tracheids, and vessels all have cell walls that are substantially thickened with lignin.
  3. Lignin is also found in the cell walls of sclerenchyma.

The cell wall’s thickening at secondary wall junctions is what gives it its strength.

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